Inky Thots: Birmingham Polar Bear

 Birmingham Polar Bear ink is named in honor
of the Polar Bears at the Highland Park Zoo in Pittsburgh.
I am disappointed that they do nto put this on the bottles anymore as they used to…
It was a distinctive touch!

Remember that others review these inks just for writing;
I am also interested in how they are used for ink-painting!

Note the many blues compared to Polar Bear, above.

Properties of Birmingham Polar Bear ink:

It is a well behaved ink which dries relatively quickly. It found no feathering on the various papers I tested, including my daily work journal/datebook.  When I scrubbed it, top, it showed almost no water resistance.  It has no sheen that I could produce  It is a moderate shader with my 1.1 stub nib, but when ink painting the polar bear, below, I was able to move various blues out of the ink!

The paper towel test shows all the colors of a clear clean ocean.

*Above, watercolors, from Daniel Smith.*

MOST water soluble ink companies do not pay attention to lightfast qualities
and Birmingham is no different in this line of inks.
Most artists who use ink are making prints of their work —
But ink-painting is becoming more interesting so maybe it is time!


Of course I had to sketch a polar bear, and I am happy with how s/he turned out!
Drew on cold press watercolor paper and touched the lines with water
using a Pentel Aquash waterbrush… lines disappeared.
This was a 60 minute sketch with water movement…

The ink changes color under various lights,
more than other inks.

It has found what may be a permanent home in my Woodshed Pen,
a perfect match and the pen likes this ink!

 I like what Birmingham says on their website:
We started Birmingham Pen Co. in 2012 in
the Southside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
The region of Pittsburgh where we began once  called “Little Birmingham” due to the area’s prolific manufacturing industry in the early 1900’s. The Birmingham moniker was derived from Birmingham, UK – a manufacturing hub that specialized in, among other things, pen and nib manufacturing with thousands of craftspeople employed in the industry. 
We chose the name Birmingham Pen Company  to share this little known piece of history and continue in the traditions behind the name.”

Birmingham’s bottles are glass, and functional
even in the small sizes.  I like glass bottles;
they feel like they will last longer.

This is a small family business run by four people!  The brothers, Nick and Josh;
Dad is the chief pen machinist;  and Mom does one of the coolest things about Birmingham, which is their amazing historic names!

I bought this  Birmingham Polar Bear ink from Birmingham.

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USk: NW Vaughn St


East street from NW Wilson by one block…
flanked on both sides by homes similar to the ones on NW Wilson.
Nice memories of buying Christmas trees for several years;
no Christmas trees in June, so I took liberties with our  memories!

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Woodshed Pen gets a New Ink!

Mitchell bought my Woodshed pen from Mike Allen:
since following him on IG I have grown to love him even more as he is a dog lover,
taking in strays that show up at his door and either giving them home or finding them homes.  I like that our dollars go to his saving dogs…

I put a new blue from Birmingham Pen Co, Birmingham Polar Bear.
The blue changes color under flash…

Taking it out for a run, I sketched our blue hand-blown Mexican glasses… perfect!

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USk: NW Wilson St

In NW Portland there is an area we often drive through on our way to other places,
and each time I think about what a sweet neighborhood
this must have been before the area around it become warehouses…
At some point it will become high-rises.

I decided to sketch them; they’ve given me such delight!

I sketched them on site, and back in studio I inked
using a Platinum Carbon pen, and added color.

I started with NW Wilson…
the longest of the lovely old streets with all homes intact.


This time of year the greens are so bright and varied;
I had the most fun mixing greens.


The houses are all the same, alternating the exteriors,
which means they were probably all built by a developer as early track homes
of some sort, though not marketed the way they are today.
I never noticed before I drew them.

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In Memory of My Brother


Oh I’ve had him on my mind….
Nine years gone, and I miss him more than I’ve ever missed anyone I’ve lost.
He was a man who connected and cared, reached out
and made sure you were thought of in lots of little ways..


He was fun, and when we both lived in Los Angeles we saw a lot of each other.
I went to the bars he tended, and he came by the apartment.
He knew many of the men I dated.

When he opened the Museum in Dana Point, an antiquities shop, it felt more like his calling than anything he’d done, and I had a blast setting it up with him.
I took away a couple of pieces for payment of the days we spent sifting and organizing.
He never tried to lock me out of his life.

I have a box of cards from him…. still.

He would have loved this business we are in, and probably worked with us.

Anyhow, short note, I miss him.  Terribly.

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Some people….

This is about all I have to say…

and…
Sir Billy Connolly – Fuck Off: A Video

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Inky Thots: Robert Oster Green at Night


I love the name of this Robert Oster ink, Green at Night!
It is a moody dark green that, when washed, brightens!  The forest scene above was drawn over a light wash of Robert Oster’s Green at Night. with a TWSBI Eco 1.1.

Remember that others review these inks just for writing;
I am also interested in how they are used for ink-painting!

Properties of Robert Oster’s Green at Night:

This ink is well-behaved.  It does not feather on any of the papers I normally use, even Post-its.  I consider it a medium ink, neither wet nor dry, and it evaporates quickly with a wet nib such as a stub.  It has never smeared on me during a sketch.  It has a hint of a  sheen, hard to image.  The gorgeous colors it emits when wet are deep green to clear turquoise blues, making it a lovely sketching ink.  It moves easily when hit with water, with no resistance or ghosting.  It is not water resistant.

*Above, watercolors, from Daniel Smith, Holbein, and Sennellier.*

The paper towel test combined with the watery movement above
shows how many colors lay beneath the dark green!  The deepest green is the color of black tourmaline, and moves into jadite. When the edge is touched with water it moves easily into the blue and turquoises shown. Looking at watercolor comparisons, I offer Daniel Smith’s Black Tourmaline, Jadite, Amazonite, and Cobalt, plus Holbien’s Veridian and Sennelier’s Phthalo.  Amethyst can be seen too!

RO is experimenting and testing lightfast properties…
MOST water soluble ink companies do not pay attention to these things
because most artists who use ink are making prints of their work.


On smooth Hahnemühle Nostalgie Sketchbook paper I created a very fast sketch of
Tuilleries in Paris, then came back and touched the tree lines and shadows with a
Pentel Aquash waterbrush.  After I strengthened the lines for definition.

The non-toxic inks come in 50ml plastic bottles that are environmentally friendly, using recycled plastic.  They can be tippy, so I usually put them in a more solid container to decant. All my pens fit easily into the bottle opening to fill.

Other Robert Oster Inks reviewed in this manner to date:
Robert Oster Jade, Robert Oster Melon Tea,
Robert Oster Fire Engine Red, Robert Oster Thunderstorm,
Robert Oster Fire Engine Red, Robert Oster Charcoal, Robert Oster Citrus, Robert Oster’s No Fixed Address, Robert Oster Sydney Lavender, Robert Oster Aussie Brown, Robert Oster Heart of Gold, Robert Oster Aussie Liquid Gold, Robert Oster Sterling Silver, and Robert Oster’s Vanness Exclusives

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Inky Thots: Birmingham Everlasting Inks

Birmingham has a new lineup of beautiful water-resistant inks, their Everlasting Inks.  These inks are quite water-resistant (not 100% waterPROOF) and excellent for writing precious documents.  For sketching or use with watercolors or other fluid mediums over the top, I recommend testing them on your art papers to see how/if they move…  They moved in my Hahnemühle Nostalgie Sketchbook when scrubbed with a lot of water (Jinhao Sharks with fine points), shown below, but less in my Hahnemühle Watercolour Journal, right, using dip pens.

I test all my resistant inks
in the back of my journals before I risk ruining a nice sketch with running inks. The inks are water resistant enough that I could use them in my journals  — I just have to consider what I want in my watercolor washes.  See more below about use with watercolors.


Remember that others review these inks just for writing;
I am also usually interested in how they are used for ink-painting!

I’ve put the three colors right through their paces in my work journal,
on Post-its and cheap yellow legal pads (Mitchell uses the latter)
and on a good Hahnemühle sketch journal, below.

No bleed through in any testing papers.  There was a bit of feathering on a very bad watercolor journal with a fat wet dip pen, see the blobby fat pens top.  It is unlikely that you would use bad watercolor paper and a fat wet dip pen — but if you do, test in the back of the journal. Most of these were tested in fine-nib Jinhao Sharks, and were well-behaved though a bit dry, so will work well in your wet-writing pens. I saw no sheen that I could produce (and didn’t expect it in this ink), and no shading in my samples,
again, not unusual for water-resistant inks.

Above and below, more testing on the smooth paper in my Hahnemühle Nostalgie Sketchbook.  Sketched like a dream on the smooth paper!

Below, again the smoother Hahnemühle journal in watercolor tests.
It is is less absorbent than the
watercolor paper.
On this paper, if I let the inks completely dry, they were very water-resistant
(not 100% waterPROOF) to light, fast washes (as opposed to multiple washes or the scrubbing of lettering in the tests top) and moved almost not at all.
At the back of the book when I tested them with a heavier watercolor wash
they moved enough to tinge the clear yellow watercolor wash.
Also, it depended on how many watercolor washings I gave them.
So, as I do with all water resistant inks,
I recommend testing them on your art papers to see how or if they move,
and if you are sketching yellow tulips maybe using a waterproof ink.


 I like what Birmingham says on their website
about their company:
We started Birmingham Pen Co. in 2012 in the Southside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  The region of Pittsburgh where we began once called “Little Birmingham” due to the area’s prolific manufacturing industry in the early 1900’s.  The Birmingham moniker was derived from Birmingham, UK – a manufacturing hub that specialized in, among other things, pen and nib manufacturing with thousands of craftspeople employed in the industry. We chose the name Birmingham Pen Company to share this little known piece of history and
continue in the traditions behind the name.”

Birmingham’s bottles are glass, and functional
even in the small sizes.  I like glass bottles;
they feel like they will last longer.


Birmingham also turns their own pens,
which I’ve noticed often sell out as fast as they make them!
*I LOVE my Model-A Demonstrator, Violet Beauregarde!*

This is a small family business run by four people!  The brothers, Nick and Josh;
Dad is the chief pen machinist; and Mom does one of the coolest things about Birmingham, which is their amazing historic names!

Disclosure, I was gifted with these sample inks from Birmingham.

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Inky Thots: Krishna Pencil

Remember that others review these inks just for writing;
I am also interested in how they are used for ink-painting!


I love this oddball ink.  It looks mauvish then can also look biscuit grey,
and I have no idea why they named it pencil — not like pencil at all!

Properties of Krishna Pencil ink:

 Krishna Pencil ink is crisp on all my papers, even Post-its, no feathering.  I have it in a fine pen, but it appears to dry in normal time, no smearing.  As is true so far wiht all Krishna inks, it is highly soluble.  The brush moves the color, easily, and when scrubbed/rewet it shows all the grey to purple-grey colors. I could produce no sheen, but that is okay by me.  Sheen is a fun by product but not the reason I buy an ink.

Placed onto a paper towel and hit with water, you can also see the green that pulls out of it.  I’m not fond of the color mauve, but for some reason I like this color!

Above, watercolors from Daniel Smith which resemble this ink:
Shungite, Amethyst, Peimontite — all Primateks or mineral watercolors.*


Above, a sketch on watercolor paper, and you can see how the ink can go brown-grey to purple on the same page!  Crazy!  I paired it with actual pencil “lead”.

Above, the same ink on smooth Hahnemühle Nostalgie Sketchbook paper,
and again, see how the ink changes from pinky to brown?
ONLY Krishna Pencil ink was used in this sketch!

I was unable to find out if the inks are lightfast, and have not performed my own tests.
Most artists who use ink are making prints of their work —
But ink-painting is becoming more popular so maybe it is time!

I love their little glass bottles… Simple, squatty body, nice shape for filling pens, and does not tip easily.  At its price point it is a nice ink to add when you want to make shipping minimums! You can try the hand-made inks for almost the cost of a sample in some other higher priced inks — so that allows many bottle to be bought!

From their website: “Krishna Inks is the brainchild of Dr. Sreekumar, a medical professional by day. He brings his passion from his younger days, when he would grind and turn fountain pens. Dr. Sreekumar, a believer of the “Make in India” campaign, hand makes these inks at his workshop in Kerala, India.”

Disclaimer, I bought this ink:
no one is paying me to write these reviews.

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Pillows


It’s been ages since I have pulled out my watercolors for anything more than a splash.

You know that I don’t artists criticizing their work, but in this case, I am sharing with you a process of my own, as I learn to risk and push my own boundaries, and as such it is a reflection of my critique in order to grow as an artist.

In sharing I intend to show the kindness I offer to my processes, because without risking I can’t grow, and yet I can still have a critical eye to what I strove for and what I created.

This was a huge push for me, as the items I wanted to place into my journal were the many vibrant pillows I’ve been hand-stitching for the business for weeks.

Fingers to the bone from stitching, my hands had little ability to do much more than soak in Epsom salts!  I’ve not had it in me to do much at the end of a stitching day.

The pillows are shot silk, which is a shimmering material, rich deep colors as only silks can produce.  I am sharing images of the pillows below so you can see the reality of what I was trying to capture.

I loved my pen sketch (see below), created with Platinum Carbon ink. I almost chickened out on moving forward with the watercolors.

I used a diluted waterproof grey ink to lay in some shadows, my own, not “accurate” to reality, but accents where I knew I wanted the grey ink to shift the watercolors on top.  See below for grey ink images.

It was nice to have the bits and bobs of gimp trims in front of me as I was afraid to be near the finished pillows with watercolors — one spill would cost me days.

The washes I created were sometimes mixes of various Quinacrodone golds with Daniel Smith Primateks, such as Rhodonite, Amethyst, or Terre Ecole.  This allowed the base colors to shift slightly as I laid layers of color onto the paper.

My challenge was to layer deep colors one on top of the other without them getting muddy.  Muddy is where watercolors go to die!  As you can see from the details above, I did pretty well.  Waiting for the colors to dry thoroughly then topping the next layer quickly so as not to activate the dry watercolor below was key, and I am pretty happy!

Another challenge — to mix enough of each wash to cover the area.
This is always a push for me — I never quite seem to have enough and so you can see below where I had to mix more (or maybe you can’t, but I can.)

So my final critique is such a surprise — I don’t like my layout!
The balance of colors bothers me, which apparently I didn’t take into account as I was sailing along sketching details!  So I did another thing I have never done —
I lifted paint (lower right-hand corner) and added paint after I was finished.
It is still problematic to me, but better than before.
In truth, I should have placed the round pillow in the middle both due to the shape and the color, separating the vibrant red-orange pillows in both color and shape.

BTW, the floral peachy details along each edge are details from
the French Louis XIV Settees, which our client has us paint instead of restoring
to the original shellac with gilt accents on the flowers; as the pieces were previously stripped (by others), we were open to doing something unconventional.

In the end. I’ve learned so much from pushing myself to try this layering of deep colors, trying not to muddy but pushing to add complexity with watercolor.
It is so much easier with acrylics!

Above, the revised finished spread versus what I thought was finished, below.
Grey inked spread, then the inked spread.

It drives me crazy when I can’t scroll through images but have to open each independently, so that is why I often end with all the images.

A couple of details of the actual pillows, below,
and I also added the original sketches we showed the client.
Also, as this project was in our studio for a long time, I have other posts:
Mitchell on the Louis XVI Sofa
Sketching for Presentations: French Sofa
Sketching for Presentations: Pair of Louies

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No Time

For 2-3 weeks I have been wearing my fingers to the bone hand-stitching on a project for our actual business.  These are pillows to go with two French Louis XIV Settees, and a longer French Empire Sofa, both from the 18th Century.

So at the end of the day, little sketching was completed… I’ve been soaking my hands in Epsom salt water!

I have a lovely new ink from Robert Oster, Whisper Red.  Paler than other reds, and it is now in my Red Diplomat Aero, the first change since Fire Engine went into it.  I would call it a very dark pinky red, and it is the first Robert Oster ink I would consider dry.  My Aero is not a gusher, so it will probably end up in a wetter pen.

I won some washi tapes from Esterbrook, and they arrived, right.  They are very masculine, which would be nice for guys as you don’t see many masculine tapes.  I will have fun with them and may do a giveaway of all four just for fun.

And our biggest treat, our pot of gold at the end of long days, is that we are ordering take-out again.  Yummy takeout, cooked by Long Garden… It has been a year since we ordered takeout!!

What I’ve been working my fingers to the bone sewing:

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New Pen Day: TWSBI Eco


It’s not that I collect TWSBI Ecos
If I did, then I would have the Rose Gold variety, but they are not my thang.
I do LOVE these pens, however.
They are an ever-ready bunny pen, and hold a ton of ink, so I never run out!


I bought the lilac (center, above) because I am committed to have the steely colors…
even though it is a pastel.
I popped a wine-colored ink (Robert Oster Australian Shiraz) into it and am loving that!

I’ve love to draw TWSBI Ecos… They are architectural, like little buildings,
and you can see all the ways they work inside which is very cool.

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Pandemic Exhaustion


We’ve been exhausted at the end of our days, and so watch more tele than normal…
and also, we often go back to favorite shows rather than try new shows…
Lazy and tired and we often fall asleep with the tele on!

Shows: NCIS, Grace and Frankie, Blue Bloods, Raymond, Madame Secretary,
Burn Notice, Midsummer Murders and other Acorn programs are favorites.


Birmingham has a new lineup of water-resistant inks: Everlasting Inks.
These inks are quite water-resistant (not 100% waterPROOF), but close.
I recommend testing them on your art papers to see how or if they move…
On some papers they didn’t move at all… On some papers they moved every so slightly.
Also, it depended on how many watercolor washings I gave them.
They above tests were done with light, fast washes and they moved almost not at all.

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Coping


Okay, I am coping.  Some movement I attribute to working these items below.
Like exercise, you have to force it then it feels good.
(Okay, me and exercise, in theory only.)
Maybe some is the answer to prayers, a shift in consciousness.
Perhaps some is the collective sighing a sigh of relief.

Gratitude.

Mind you, I didn’t want to do it, and now am sorry I stopped,
as I used to write gratitude daily and it works.  I am forcing myself to do this again.
I do have many things for which I am grateful.
My husband — and that I am not walking through this alone,
which many people are, and that would be lonely and frightening.
My cats, who make me laugh with their antics.  Never a dull moment.
A job.  I may sometimes hate it but I am grateful for it.
My Buddhist practice… Having a spiritual practice supports me in so many ways.

Sometimes, I simply do “it” for the ones I love.

Whatever “it” is, like keeping a good frame of mind in the studio to help bolster Mitchell.
If I am drowning then of course I tell him, but keeping things positive for him is a way to keep things positive for me.  This also applies to cooking good meals,
and saying thank you when he brings me coffee in the mornings.

Celebrating memories.

In past, I have not paid attention to Facebook offering up memories, but these days I am looking at the memories as many are positive.  It reminded me that I have to take the time to remember good times, silly stuff, and crate celebration.  Luckily, all I have to do is look up on my wall.  Mitchell and friends send me things, and these cheer me.

Friends.

I shared my struggles on Facebook and here and have many public and private responses… knowing that others are struggling is comforting, even if I wish they were not.
My blogging buddies are the best, and art buddies.
I have a few friends from high school days, and that is nice too.

Ritual.

I’ve been creating ritual for so long I forget to talk about it…
but it is so important to our lives.
I work with the phases of the moon, building and releasing — as I publish this we are going into the Dark of the Moon, a releasing period.
And there are daily rituals around the cats, our work days, and divination.

Is this something you all might be interested in?

Forcing myself to sketch.  Anything.

Hardest one yet, but doing this over the weekend when I didn’t want sketch, it helped.
And shockingly, I am pleased with what I posted this week, a pleasant surprise!

What works for you?

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Delight

Lights!

I wanted to stay with objects that delight.
Lights are strung on our bookcases in both studio and home,
colorful, brilliant spots of twinkle that delight our hearts.

We both love color, and our choices of objects that sit on our bookcases are brightly colored and evoke strong memories and emotions:
photos of loved ones (cats and dogs and a few other  family members)
and deities and pieces of pottery and childhood objects and
candle holders though we rarely burn candles and never at the studio.
Right now I have a few things from my mom’s home,
as I try to decide what to do with them, to keep or let go of them.

Books! 

We love books, art books and Buddhist books and Vedic books and history books,
books on the all the god/desses  from many traditions, and sacred geometry.
They are sacred objects; I do not own an iPad and have no desire for one.
I love the smell and feel of a book in my hand, and some of these books have been with either Mitchell or I our entire adult lives.
The info within delighted us and fed us and transformed us
and grew us up into more conscious individuals.

“The ache for home lives in all of us. 
The safe place where we can go as we are and not be questioned.”
~Maya Angelou

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Port Townsend Bowl

While writing about being stuck, I was inspired by a friend, Lucia Maya,
of Luminous Ceramics (beautiful pottery in Maui colors).
She published a quote (see below) that moved me, and came on the heels of me finding a small chip on one of our beloved bowls.  We love handmade pottery, and each piece we own has memories, and fills our hearts when we use them.

Trying to capture the lovely organic glazes on our bowl, which fits into my palms.
I was heartbroken to see a small chip in it,
though Mitchell will repair it so that it does not further disintegrate.
Repairing it and continuing to use it will now be part of the memories and charm…


Nicola Gillis is now a potter I also follow!
Both women create beautiful, simply stunning pieces, very different.

This is one of the first pieces I’ve done that was not part of Virtual Sketchwalk,
but meaningful to me and sketched in my sketchbook of memories.

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“Memory is more indelible than ink.”
Anita Loos, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.
“I think not….
Me… why I journal!

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Unwinding Stuck

I am trying to work my way out of a creative block and depression.  I am so stuck.
I don’t remember the last time I was stuck like this… weeks on end.  I was looking for images for something I am writing and went back through a few journals and cannot believe the difference between pre-2020 and post-2020.  I’d like to blame it on Covid but there is more.

Looking deeply, using all my words, I became overly cautious, lazy, critical, worried… I stopped sketching.  Part of this was exhaustion from the stress in our business due to Covid issues*, but I am also depressed.  I sleep like I did when I was a teen, and I feel hopeless.

Always risky to share journal entries, but this is important.  I went back to some earlier journals and Natalie Goldberg’s books on writing… and applied it to art.
Creativity is creativity, after all.

I identified — and that was easy — that the iffiness of income is stressful.  We have enough work in the business but clients are paying sluggishly, and that is difficult.  Also, the stress in the business due to Covid is handling procedures, and also difficulty in finding materials.  So many people have gone out of business, or if not, are on limited schedules so that we have to time calling them for orders.  The former also adds to our stress — when a great business goes away then you can’t help but look at what could happen in your own.  I think if we were younger it would have less impact but the hours added to our days just to try to stay on schedule is considerable and the best clients understand and then there are the others that simply add to our stress as our schedules have radically changed.

Setting all this aside, I moved to my personal issues with creativity,
writing through then, asking questions of myself then answering.
Writing it all down was the best thing I could do.

And through it all, I had to keep remembering to breathe, breath deeply, breathe often.  Are you aware when you hold your breath to steel against whatever is coming?
Breath-work is the way out of that anxiety-producing activity.


“I am too old now…” 
Wow that one runs through my head constantly!
Maybe some is this is for good reason — I am exhausted and feel old and worn out!
In the end I don’t think this has anything to do with how other’s perceive me but it is about being tired and lack of time… When you are young taking a year out is not as big a deal as when you are in your sixties…

Still, if it is a perceived lack of time then why am I not using all my spare minutes?

Depression.  Again, I asked, “Why?” and listened, writing.

“I’ll never sell anything.”   Crap.
That is about the massive rejection I’ve had, and so that is a hard one to fight.  I actually have been turned down constantly for anything art related.  Not so architecture or writing.
I have a goal of moving to augment our living with my artwork, but it seems futile.
Okay, I will work on this little ditty that runs through my head.

I took a break and sketched a bit and will share that later.  Then…


This came up as I was sketching:  “Am I an artist or am I a teacher?”

Yes I can be both but where is my interest?
Teaching, it has always been teaching, with art/writing coming a close second.
I am never tired when teaching, and this is probably why I keep a blog.

I also can paint or write for hours without tiring, and am eager to return to it.

This is all a good start and btw, writing this down instead of having it swirl in my head is a step toward climbing out of this hole in which I am sinking!

*Note: we do not have Covid…
and…
One of my great pleasures is writing with Chesapeake Pen Company’s pens.

To hear about classes, follow me on Instagram, Facebook
or check out my new, improved dkatiepowellart.com

Posted in art journal, commentary, creativity, journal, meditation, painting, pen & ink, process, ritual, sketchbook, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

VSW: Cathedral of Saint Basil’s, Moscow


I’ve started this study very late
on a weekend night.  The building is
the Cathedral of Saint Basil, AKA Cathedral of Vasily the Blessed, AKA Cathedral of the Intersession of the Most Holy Theotokos on the Moat (image right from Wikipedia).

Or, CIMHTM if you like acronyms!

Magical turrets and bubbling rooftops created fairy-tale building imagery that is so so different from our buildings in the USA… I have to believe that Disney saw Russia before creating Disneyland.

I started again by blocking the onion domes in pencil.
Is there anything harder to freehand than swirling diminishing stripes?
Truly wonky sketches!

Then I began in the center of the motifs with detail, moving outward,
inking with a Platinum Carbon fountain pen in Platinum Carbon Waterproof ink.


Watercolor took much less time, and it felt a little too color-by-numbers to be fun.
I know I have actual gold watercolor that shimmers but can not find it!
If I have time for one more I may do the next one in a
fantasy manner, adding magical colors as if the building is a fairy building,
as they sort of lend themselves to bright color!

The images I used were provided by Aniko Szedlak;
In a rare instance I thought you all should see the entire building, hence the Wiki pic.

To hear about classes, follow me on Instagram, Facebook
or check out my new, improved dkatiepowellart.com

Posted in architecture, art journal, creativity, drawing, ink painting, journal, painting, pen & ink, process, sketchbook, virtual sketching, watercolor, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments